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in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means o
in recent history? and if things are so bad why haven't the british like say the people of greece or spain taken to the streets? to discuss this i'm joined by ian beg who is a research fellow at the london school of economics. so professor beg, we hear talk this being the worst recession since the second world war. is it? >> it's been a long recession and it's very slow to see any kind of recovery. but it's also worth remembering statistically although being one of the worst in the last century, we actually today are as well off as in 2006. we've only gone back by a few steps. >> is it simply a case that it feels like the worst recession that anyone can remember? >> it's the fact that it hasn't gone to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
with the resources at hand. -- >> the c.s. becoming like greece? >> no, that is a profoundly -- do you see as becoming like greece? >> that is a profoundly different situation. the congressional budget office says that if we stay on the course we are on, we will have a debt that is 230% of our gross domestic product of the the next 20 years. most experts say once you get a debt of more than 9% of gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth in a significant way. this is just about -- not just about numbers on page, it is really about opportunities for people. whether you will be able to send your kid to school, to college, whether it will be able to buy a car, my house, whether we will have economic opportunity for the people of the country. the best academic research that has been done shows that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast. opportunity is lost. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talk
this administration. we have to reduce spending. we are heading down the same path that greece did. right now the democrats are talking about raising taxes on the top 2%. if we do not stop the spending, we will be back here again maybe one year from now saying, maybe we need to raise taxes on the top 25% or 50%. then everybody will be taxed and we will run out of money. what is going to happen is the federal government is not going to be able to take care of its obligations. you are not going to be able to have safety nets. social security and medicare are going broke. we have to fix those of those who are dependent on those systems can get them. continuing to spend money like both parties have been doing the, wild spending is going to lead us to be just like greece. we are not going to be able to take care of the poor or the needy or take care of senior citizens. we have to stop spending. host: this is fiscal year 2010, but it has not changed significantly in terms of percentage. 41% of the federal budget. not defense appropriations 19%. defense spending 20%. the national debt 6%. we're in t
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
austerity measures have prolonged. not taken that area out of recession. in greece, you often hear members of this house who say the united states economy is going to be like greece. oh, really? greece is not growing. greece has lost 25% in its economy in the past five years. greece's economy shrunk by 7% this year alone. there's a 20% unemployment rate in greece and even higher for younger people. greece doesn't make anything that the rest of the world wants. the american economy is dynamic. the american economy always needs to be improving with education, scientific research and infrastructure investment. so, a rational system, a rational political system would respond much differently than what is going on here in this congress. we're talking about spending cuts and allowing tax cuts that haven't produced economic growth to be extended. all of the people that are talking about spending did all the spending. they are the debt and deficit creators. if we want to experience economic growth we have to invest in this economy. and it's critically important to the future of this nation. medica
you do is say, we are in trouble, we will borrow in loans and give it to people. that is called greece. that is what the trade minister said. they are not serious about welfare, the deficit, or a serious party. everybody can see it. >> order. >> double very much. will the prime minister join me and the whole crowd in sending our condolences -- we urge anybody who wants to donate to the king edward the seventh memorial fund. >> i am sure the whole house and indeed the whole country will join the honorable lady and join me in paying tribute to this nurse and giving all our sympathies. she clearly loved her job, loved her work, cared deeply about health of her patients, and what has happened is a complete tragedy. there are many lessons that will need to be learned. i echo what she said about what in the press keep their distance. >> is the prime minister still intending to introduce to snooper's chartaer? does he realize that he will be spying and more people in britain than even all the press barons put together? did -- where did he get his advice and ideas from? >> i really believe on
-- forays to greece were utter disasters. i would love to follow hovering behind him churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting and it is norway, then when he sells his generals on maybe the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, then he says no, no, we will go to sumatra instead. he gave them fits. host: so, you would tell all kinds of stories in here. you covered the dunkirk story. where was he, what year is dunkirk, what was it and where was he in this process? guest: the evacuation? host: yes. guest: that would be the last week of m
, the people who are really going to be hurt are the poor. 25% unemployment in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average in the united states. we see pensions being cut without any notice hardly at all. social programs slashed. there is at least some probability that will happen to us. i will say it is a certainty eventually if we do not do something about the situation. i would think they would be much more sober in their demand. at this moment, i do not see it. >> i would say a lot of this is, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation. part of the disservice is the debate is having today is it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most depressing issue, i am more optimistic. it is steering the conversation away from that. it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. i do not think we have 25 years anymore. maybe it is two or five. we get closer and closer every year that we build up our debt and every year that we postpone tacklin
of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resisted very strongly. the nazis had one of the most resistant mov
stay on the pathway we're currently on we're headed to the nanny state which is france and greece. that concerns me a great deal and the country will not be able to deal with the leader of the free world if we continue on that pathway. >> what would that look like for the average citizen? >> the average citizen more and more their life would be dependent on uncle sam. the difference between america and the rest of the world is our founding fathers placed the highest priority on individual enterprise and individual spirit. if people are willing to say my dependent upon my own willingness to work hard and impact the process we will continue to have that driving force that makes us the strongest country in the world. if we're not careful, we will walk away from it and soon, unfortunately, we'll be like france. >> do you have any sense there is a generational sense on views how the government should serve the public among younger americans than it is among baby boomers and older? >> i'm hopeful we can convince the cross section of the younger generation that their contribution to our
becoming greece, no real reduction in our deficit or our debt. the good news, senator mccain, is that we're one big deal away from dominating the 21st century because america's problems are really less than most other places. the bad news is that that deal is elusive, it requires presidential leadership, and i haven't seen much of it, and if we say on the course we're on today, we're going to lose the american dream because your grandchildren and your children cannot pay off the debt you're about to pass on to them. so in about two months, round two begins and we will be asked to raise the debt ceiling. trust me, i don't want to default on our obligations, but in august of 2011, we borrowed $2.1 trillion because we ran out of money and 42 cents of every dollar we spend is borrowed money. if you don't keep borrowing, you will have to cut the government by 42%. nobody suggests that that's a good idea overnight. but here's what i won't do. i won't continue borrowing money unless we address in the process what got us into debt to begin with. so when we have to raise the debt ceiling again, i
not become greece? it is interesting that we talked about the fiscal coordination have in the countries and to last come along and bail them out when they have not done what they're supposed to do? i do not know that we are that much different. we have a great panel. people thought are far smarter than i am. i will introduce them now. and then i will sit down and i did ask some questions to revival at the panel to keep their answers relatively short so we can run through a lot of questions and get out of here on time. we have ailson frasier, director of the institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues, including federal spending, taxes, the debt and deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor. next, rudy penner, the institute fellow and the rj and francis miller chair in public policy at the urban institute. prior to that in his long career, he was director of the congressional bu
been doing is going to lead us to being just like greece. we will not be able to take care of the poor and needy or senior citizens. we've got to stop spending. host: this is from the congressional budget office -- social security, medicare, and medicaid are 41% of the federal budget. defense spending is 20% area do you cut? >> we have to cut across the whole circle. it is not the so-called congress' spending. it is everything in that pie plate. need to fix social security and medicare because they are going broke. democratic colleagues are totally in denial. they think they have a policy regarding social security and medicare. they say denied it is a problem and they deny -- and a delay fixing it and third, they will destroy the programs because they are denying and delighting and they are demonizing those of us who want to try to fix it. we need to fix it so that social security and medicare are available for those people needed. we've got to put in place policies that will do so. the democrats have been totally against are doing so. host: are you worried that the republicans are jus
will not become greece. no one is more worried about this nation's unsustainable debt situation than senator demint. i've seen him deinvolve over time to someone who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices is he h would a lost our way that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on america, jim undstands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing wt he thought was best for south caroli
another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resist
everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded against the germans, and in short order the french collapsed against belgium. they did it over a week -- at first, they thought they would get 10,000 or 12,000 men out. then anything that could float was sent over there. the got more than 200,000 british troops out. i found it interesting that several thousand fren
can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending to% of gdp on national security. -- 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because it cannot afford it. host: democratic caller, new jersey. caller: i am a retired attorney colonel. i've done a lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about social security and medicare, the entitlements, and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. it has no part today in a problem. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund, the huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 were people stopped paying taxes and started drawing welfare, and number three, we have the tax cuts, the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which have severely reduced the amount of revenue. the tax burden on americans from the federal government today is an 80-year low. we cannot fund the government with the revenues and loss in jobs that we have. host: cbo has done
people believe that what's happening in greece cannot happen in the united states. but think about it. greece kept borrowing and spending until eventually they couldn't pay their public workers, take care of the elderly or the poor or deliver any of the services promised to their people. the united states is headed down the very same path. we'll be right back here having this same debate very soon if we don't cut spending. instead we'll be discussing the top 2%, next time it will be the top 50%. and so on. until we're all being attacked, every one. but spending so much that we still cannot meet our only gations -- obligations. this debate should be about spending, not taxes. so that we can give the american people what they want, a strong economy and a guarantee that programs like social security and medicare will remain in tact. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from the virgin islands seek recognition? mrs. christensen: address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without
at the pace it has been growing. we do have an advantage that greece does not have. we print the world's money. we cannot expect the dollar will be keen to tomorrow. -- forever. if the europeans can manage their deficit and we cannot, the world will switch to euros. there is a tweet here -- guest: the cbo is supposed to be a political, but it cannot be too alarmist. if we go over the cliff, we are looking on january 1, some of this is already milton. about $600 million -- $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases. that is about 4% of gdp. that is an enormous negative stimulus. a detraction from demand. that would surely be a deep recession. the cbo relies on simulation models that did not take into consideration investor sentiment, the reaction of consumers, and so forth that they wholly lose confidence in their government. if we go over the cliff and stay there, people will start to conclude that washington cannot manage its affairs. all bets are off on economic modeling. it is impossible to say what happened that other than it would be very negative. host: one piece that you actually d
that this country could become like greece. do you see that as a possibility? >> no, i do not see that as a -- i do not see us becoming a light breeze. it is a profoundly different situation. i do see the possibility that we could have the debt that could truly be harmful. the congressional budget office, which is nonpartisan, says if we stay on the course we are on, we'll have a debt that is 230% of our gdp over the next 20 years. most of the experts say that once you get a debt over 90% of your gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth. and in a pretty significant way. this is not just about numbers. it is about opportunities for people. whether you'll be able to send your kid to school, send them to college, whether they will be able to buy a car, buy a house. are you going to be able to start a business and have it succeed? whether or not you have economic opportunity for the people of the country. and we know with the best academic research that has been done that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast.
the republican candidate but this country could become like greece. do you see that as a possibility? >> no. it is a profoundly different situation. i do see the possibility that we could have debt that would truly be harmful. the congressional budget office says if we stay on the course we're wrong, we will have a debt that is 230% of our gross domestic product over the next 20 years. most experts say, once you get a debt of more than 90% of your gross domestic product, that inhibits future economic growth. this is not just about numbers and a page. it is really about opportunities for people. whether you're going to be able to send your kid to school, some of the college, whether you're quite able to buy a car, buy a house, start a business and have it succeed. whether or not you're going to have economic opportunity for the people of the country. we know with the best academic research that has been done that if a country's debt it's too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast. opportunity is lost. jobs are lost. there is a similarity to what i
romney kept saying this country could be on the road to be more like greece if we did not get our arms around it. the unemployment rate remains high. are you optimistic in the short term about our country's future. >> it is hard to be. i tried to be. if we can get this resolved, this fiscal cliff situation, and have a pathway to seeing the deficit be reduced, cannot do it overnight, if we can see there is a path, a trajectory of slowing down the growth of spending to the point you can see the deficit will ultimately go away over a reasonable time, people will start investing again, hiring again, and i spoke to a business group yesterday and asked if they would hire just because they get a tax credit for hiring people. they said no. if you see the deficit will go away and there is hope we are on the right path to fiscal sanity, will you then hired? yes. we will have markets for our products and services and then we will need more people. we are stuck right now because all we have done for a year and a half was kick the can down the road. i voted against the act a year- and-a-half ago be
, but which is what is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. spain had a lower gdp debt ratio than we did. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries with bigger welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republ
this morning. i had no idea -- i had no idea it was an immigrant company. >> you thought it was from greece. [laughter] >> exactly, you know. i had no idea. these google -- all of these companies which maybe it needs to be a marketing campaign. i don't know. but something i think should be done to change the image of immigrants and make it more positive, and i think that will facilitate everything we're talking about today. so how do you guys think we can maybe change that image of immigrants and make it more positive and not make everybody, when they think of immigrants think of border wars on history channel. >> well, at different times and places, immigrants have been viewed more or less favorably in the united states. this is a nation of immigrants. but when immigration was largely cut off during the 1920's, a lot of americans became somewhat estranged from the immigrant roots of their forebearers. and lost a sense that we were a nation of immigrants. but in some parts of the country today you see the enormous economic vitality it comes with a really diverse and active population that a
. but it's not working incr greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. host: f
. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. -- ekle
, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raising of the debt ceiling be tied to these overall conversations or is that too dangerous? you talk about people shied away from your debt. caller: yes. you are going to have a tipping point that people are blind to. since 1847 with popular delusions and the madness of crowds when you get a contagion in there, you do not know what is going to be. people are going to run for the door. it is just stupid. they should have done the tax cuts first and then see if they need to raise taxes. the more sound policy is to cut some savings first to even see if we have to raise taxes. host: here is the statement put out by the white house yesterday. it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bell. bill. susan in pennsylvania, a democratic caller. welcome to the conversation. caller: what i am thinking is the
and especially greece. the other thing we could do is come to a midline course of action where you could actually -- what can you minimally due to cut spending? what can you minimally due to have shared sacrifice so everyone is sacrificing something in this game? the other thing we don't talk about -- the interest rates on the deficit have been the lowest in 200 years. if we went back to what it was 50 years ago, it would triple. ishave not got to thin leaderst not about being popular or well- liked. he may lose his leadership role. in the end, he would have saved this country from fiscal disaster, from bankruptcy, and a crisis that will affect all americans them that all americans. . all americans. host: what would you like to see done? is this a united opinion on the right when it comes to how it should be handled? guest: let's take the impact of the tax policies. that is a very good question. if you are a worker making $60,000 a year, head of household, and if your income bracket is $60,000 a year, currently he will pay $7,800 -- you will pay $7,800 in taxes which means your net income will be
the united states in the 1930's and is characterized greece today. the program of 375 billion pounds is 0.25 of an annual nominal gdp flow. a lot of money. bront money is now expanding at over 5% and we will see the impact of that on demand later in 2013. the second action the bank has taken to provide a breathing space before these broad macroeconomic factors feedthrough is to introduce what we call a funding for lending scheme. a special scheme started on the first of august under which the bank of england, with the garden -- guarantee of the governor because this is a cause i-fiscal action, would provide four-year financing for banks to enable them to increase lending to the real economy or at the least, to contract lending to the real economy by less than they would otherwise have done. we will lend to banks according to how much they are expanding their own net lending to the real economy and the more they expand their net lending, the lower the interest rate which will charge on loans to them. there is a powerful financial incentive built into this funding for lending scheme to pers
. if not, we will become greece in 20 years. guest: that is a great point to bring up. leaders on both sides of the aisle on capitol hill have made the point that this is not a democratic or republican issue. there is waste to be curbed. what i am hearing from republicans like jon kyl is that you have to make sure america is still able to make its commitments on the world stage. we spoke with a lot of defense- heavy representative, folks from the house armed services committee. they can see that there are cuts to be made. it is just about doing it in a responsible manner rather than across the board cuts, which is less discriminatory than most defense advocates would like. host: we have earl in street louis on our line for democrats. go ahead, =- st. louis on our line for democrats. caller: i was just wondering about the defense industrial complex that president eisenhower made the comment about. the defense contract workers are union workers. i do not hear the republicans hollering about that. i am is retired veteran. i think it is time we cut back on defense programs. we could close
fiscal accounts in balance and move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it is interesting that we talk about the -- the previous panel talked about state government and one big problem in europe is there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries analogous somewhat to our states and who has to bail them out when they haven't done what they are supposed to do? i don't know that we are all that much different. so, we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am. i'm going to introduce them now and i will introduce them all and i will sit down and i get to ask some questions. i will ask the panel to keep i will ask the panel to keep their answers
the economic instability that we have in europe, as to what is happening in greece and we have our fiscal cliff here in the united states, what role do you see the council on foreign relations play in the overall big picture, especially helping to ease the situation of the economic problems in the united states? guest: the council on foreign relations is an independent, non-partisan organization that has nothing to do with the u.s. government other than the fact that our scholars try to help influence and educate the public. the government on foreign policy. the uprising in the arab world, to the caller's question, is happening in the worst of all possible times. the u.s. and strapped financially. europe is back in a recession and confronted with serious economic problems, but europe and the united states would, in the past, be the place that traditionally had helped to support economic change and prosperity in that part of the world. now what we're seeing are caught are countries like -- are countries like qatar in saudi arabia stepping in. again, the instability in the region is timed in perh
wants to see us see what happened in europe and greece. it does not have to happen here. in conjunction with that, this has to be the best place in the world to do business. economic growth, if we grow our economy, it will help our debt and, of course, more opportunity for everyone. so i hope to work with everyone on this table -- everyone at this table on those issues. worse, always making sure -- of course, always making sure that america is safe. we have many challenges around the world. [applause] >> thank you. >> my number one priority echoes what kelly said. we need to come up with a deal that keep us from the automatic spending cuts that go into effect in january and deal with a saner tax system. we can follow a framework as recommended by the simpson- bowles commission that will allow us to protect benefits but will also make some of the tough choices that kelly was talking about. i think we have to put everything on the table for that kind of a deal. we have to look at revenues. we have to look of the domestic side of the budget. we of the look of the defense -- we have to look
kind of fiscal order. if not, we will become greece in 20 years. guest: that is a great point to bring up. leaders on both sides of the aisle on capitol hill have made the point that this is not a democratic or republican issue. there is waste to be curbed. what i am hearing from republicans like jon kyl is that you have to make sure america is still able to make its commitments on the world stage. we spoke with a lot of defense- heavy representative, folks from the house armed services committee. they can see that there are cuts to be made. it is just about doing it in a responsible manner rather than across the board cuts, which is less discriminatory than most defense advocates would like. host: we have earl in street louis on our line for democrats. go ahead, - st. louis on our line for democrats. caller: i was just wondering about the defense industrial complex that president eisenhower made the comment about. the defense contract workers are union workers. i do not hear the republicans hollering about that. i am is retired veteran. i think it is time we cut back on defense progra
because nobody wants to see us see what happened ieurope and greec it does not have to happen here. in conjunction with that, this has to be the best place in the world to do business. economic growth, if we grow our economy, it will help our debt and, of course, more opportunity for everyone. so i hope to work with everyone on this table -- everyone at this table on those issues. worse, always making sure -- of course, always making sure that america is safe. [applause] >> thank you. >> my number one priority echoes what kelly said. we need to come up with a deal that keep us from the automatic spending cuts that go into effect in january and deal with a senior tax system -- a saner tax system. we can follow a framework as recommended by the simpson- bowles commission that will allow us to protect benits but will also make some of the tough choices that kelly was talking about. i think we have to put everything on the table for that kind of a deal. we have to look at revenues. we have to look of the domestic side of the budget. we of the look of the defense side. and we have to lo
's and ambassador to greece request that has very specific set of requirements with respect to funding a suspicion i have reviewed and i will say there've been 18 arb is, not a single one of them has ever been fully implemented. so i understand about this process. i'm just saying that the culture within the state department to me is one that needs to be transform. this committee can help. may be the next secretary of state can do. but the fact is there's a lot of work that needs to be done. >> senator menendez? >> thank you, mr. chairman. and i, too, want to say that senator lugar, that he is leaving behind an extraordinary, at this point untreatable serving many of the ways in the future, but an extraordinary career, and a lasting legacy in so many different ways that we appreciate your service, and certainly remember ambassador stevens as the hallmark of what foreign service is all about. you know, our challenge both here at home and abroad in the context of terrorism is that the terrorists have to only be lucky once. we have to get it right 100% of the time. it's a heavy burden. and not an easy o
slide to make us like greece, no longer a viable economic power. >> that was from the program " state of the union, close with this morning. a number of members of the house are point to try to make their way back for votes this evening at 6:30. the house taking up some 13 bills. here is how david hocking's of "congressional quarterly" termed this house session -- " >> nothing on the fiscal cliff, however. we will keep you posted on that. the senate gaveling out shortly for that caucus meeting in particular. taking a look at your twitter messages,-tag is fiscal cliff. -- the hash tag is fiscal cliff. >> also, this twitter message from about 30 minutes ago -- >> helen is in northport. you are on the air. caller: good afternoon. i am glad i lived in a country that allows me to make this phone call and speak my mind. i adhered to the u.s. constitution. rep. ron paul was giving his retirement speech and to his credit, to his credit -- to me makes a lot of sense. i believe him when he says our liberties are being weakened. i am so sorry that they tried to discredit him. he makes a lot of s
greece in the uprising against the turks? [laughter] that, by the way, is a very profound joke. if you are an empire that wants to make sure you play by the rules, it is always good to have a group that is discriminated against and they will go off to build an empire. it is very important. it just came to me with that? if you look out the rest of the democratic world, the spaniards, you name it, they're not exactly gung ho about putting their blood on the line when it comes to pursuing our values. the point, i guess, here is that you always have to have somebody who runs the show. there has to be one of very large power. usually it is anglo-saxon. we are now in a phase of american development with the power that has carried the burden over the last 60 years, as we all know, wants to lead from behind and is retracting from afghanistan, from iraq, and they're now exerting their power from afar and from above. drones above, boots on the ground. i fear if nobody takes on the responsibility of organizing and maintaining, it will not be in the of -- will not be india. >> go ahead, minister.
look for greece to increase tax rates on the wealthy next year. >> what do they say about sequestration's and also changes to entitlement programs? >> interestingly, the debt limit does not address in this proposal. you will collin they proposed a change in the way the debt limit who was released. if you are asking their aides, and they tell us the speaker would be open to increasing the debt limit, but he is sticking to his rule that it must be accompanied by cuts and spending reform equal to or greater than the increase. it could be put on the table for negotiation. they are not laying out specific changes to medicare and medicaid. they want $600 billion in health savings. they mention things that have been mentioned for a year-and-a- half, including the eligibility age for medicare for a number of years and also means testing medicare benefits so they either pay more in premiums or receive less in benefits. the change to social security is also something that has come up repeatedly in these negotiations, which is a change to the way the benefits year- over-year are calculated for the
is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries that our welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employer's. -- employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unem
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